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Fighting Rain With Style

 

By Andrea Dawn Boycillo,                         

 Princess Sophia Estiñoso,                      

Roberto Gonzales Jr.,                                

and Christian Renz Torres                            

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The extreme heat and the sudden cold of February are here to mess up your hair, your life, and most importantly, your outfit. You can’t afford to miss out on any of your classes if you ever get sick—literally sick—from the erratic weather. How do you manage your wardrobe when the morning opens like a freezer and by the middle of the day, you might as well be eating level-five tempura, sweating from the searing heat?


Do not fear! The weather of Dumaguete will no longer be the terrorizing agony of your life. (We’ll reserve that spot in your heart for the teachers who think minor subjects are a “career path.”) Dressing up for the rain and the sun will never be cumbersome with these tips in mind. (You sure wish you read this at the beginning of the school year.)
the extreme heat and the sudden cold of February are here to mess up your hair, your life, and most importantly, your outfit. You can’t afford to miss out on any of your classes if you ever get sick—literally sick—from the erratic weather. How do you manage your wardrobe when the morning opens like a freezer and by the middle of the day, you might as well be eating level-five tempura, sweating from the searing heat?

The first tip that you need to know about transitory weather wardrobe is layering. That’s when you put on a piece of clothing over another piece of clothing. Layering. Not that hard of a concept.
The logic behind this magical discovery is that, if it gets too hot, you remove the topmost layer of clothing. Ingenious! It’s like the wheel has been reinvented, except you can wear that wheel and that wheel complements your figure.

The closer the piece of clothing is to your body, the tighter it should be—but not too tight. You don’t want your sando or your t-shirt to choke you. You want it to hug like the tender caress of your crush; holding close to each of your curves. The farther the layer is from your body, the more leeway that jacket or that vest should have for breathing space. Now, hold your horses, dear reader. Don’t go grabbing that wool-knit sweater your mom got you from abroad just yet. You’re forgetting the fact that you live in the Philippines—and not in Baguio, mind you. Temperatures rise as high as 28.3°C. That’s nearly 83°F for all of the readers who come from the only five countries that still use Fahrenheit. While you’re here in the Philippines, you will never use that sweater. (Sorry, mom.)

But how do you layer, you ask. Fret not, dear reader! The secret is in the cloth. Layers are possible in this climate if those layers are thin. When you pile on thin layers of clothing—whether that’s cotton, polyester, selvedge, nylon, or chiffon—you get the same effect of one thick long-sleeved shirt without all the commitment.

Lastly, these transitory periods allow you to get away with a little pop of color in your wardrobe. During sunny days, the bright sunlight and the blue sky allow bright saturated colors such as lime green, lemon yellow, and hot pink to stand out. On contrast, during gloomy cloudy days, the harsh sunlight washes out any bright colors. That makes the common individual look sick and pallid. Commonly, neutral colors (navy blue, brown, the black-to-white spectrum) and rich colors (mustard, forest green, wine red) are used when the clouds come out.

However, on days of both rain and shine, a pop of color accentuating a neutral-themed outfit can help you both stand out of the crowd and show a little personality in your wardrobe.

Last few tips: keep your footwear waterproof and bring your umbrella. You might like your sandals today, but on days when the weather can’t make up its mind, it’s best to put on your boots and your rubber sneakers. And although a long standing umbrella may make you feel like a gentleman, lugging it around—especially on days that don’t rain—makes it a chore. A small foldable umbrella is more practical: pop it in your bag and pull it out when you’ll need it.

With these tips, you’ll be rocking your wardrobe whether the sun is out or when the rain comes pouring. It could lead you to less sick days, better grades, more money, a car, or even a lifetime committed partner. If not? Well, at least you’ll look good doing it.~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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